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29-09-2010, 09:36 AM

.docx   BITTORRENT.docx (Size: 60.18 KB / Downloads: 87)
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Existing studies on Bit Torrent systems are single-torrent based, while more than 85% of all peers participate in multiple torrents according to our trace analysis. In addition, these studies are not sufficiently insightful and accurate even for single-torrent models, due to some unrealistic assumptions. Our analysis of representative Bit Torrent traffic provides several new findings
regarding the limitations of Bit Torrent systems
(1) Due to the exponentially decreasing peer arrival rate in reality, service availability in such systems becomes poor quickly, after which it is difficult for the file to be located and downloaded.
(2) Client performance in the Bit Torrent-like systems is unstable, and fluctuates widely with the peer population.
(3) Existing systems could provide unfair services to peers, where peers with high downloading speed tend to download more and upload less. In this paper, we study these limitations on torrent evolution in realistic environments. Motivated by the analysis and modeling results, we further build a graph based multi-torrent model to study inter-torrent collaboration. Our model quantitatively provides strong motivation for inter-torrent collaboration instead of directly stimulating seeds to stay longer. We also discuss a system design to show the feasibility of multi-torrent collaboration.

Active In SP

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Joined: Jun 2010
29-09-2010, 04:10 PM

.docx   BITTORRENT.docx (Size: 52.92 KB / Downloads: 76)

BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer file sharing protocol used for distributing large amounts of data. BitTorrent is one of the most common protocols for transferring large files, and it has been estimated that it accounts for approximately 27-55% of all Internet traffic (depending on geographical location) as of February 2009.
BitTorrent protocol allows users to distribute large amounts of data without the heavy demands on their computers that would be needed for standard Internet hosting. A standard host's servers can easily be brought to a halt if high levels of simultaneous data flow are reached. The protocol works as an alternative data distribution method that makes even small computers (e.g. mobile phones) with low bandwidth capable of participating in large data transfers.
First, a user playing the role of file-provider makes a file available to the network. This first user's file is called a seed and its availability on the network allows other users, called peers, to connect and begin to download the seed file. As new peers connect to the network and request the same file, their computer receives a different piece of the data from the seed. Once multiple peers have multiple pieces of the seed, BitTorrent allows each to become a source for that portion of the file. The effect of this is to take on a small part of the task and relieve the initial user, distributing the file download task among the seed and many peers. With BitTorrent, no one computer needs to supply data in quantities which could jeopardize the task by overwhelming all resources, yet the same final result—each peer eventually receiving the entire file—is still reached.
After the file is successfully and completely downloaded by a given peer, the peer is able to shift roles and become an additional seed, helping the remaining peers to receive the entire file. This eventual shift from peers to seeders determines the overall 'health' of the file (as determined by the number of times a file is available in its complete form).
This distributed nature of BitTorrent leads to a flood like spreading of a file throughout peers. As more peers join the swarm, the likelihood of a successful download increases. Relative to standard Internet hosting, this provides a significant reduction in the original distributor's hardware and bandwidth resource costs. It also provides redundancy against system problems, reduces dependence on the original distributor and provides a source for the file which is generally temporary and therefore harder to trace than when provided by the enduring availability of a host in standard file distribution techniques.
Programmer Bram Cohen designed the protocol in April 2001 and released a first implementation on 2 July 2001. It is now maintained by Cohen's company BitTorrent, Inc. There are numerous BitTorrent clients available for a variety of computing platforms.

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